BRACES

A Smile That’s Perfect

Let Us Create A Smile That’s Perfect For Your Child

 

What does the perfect smile look like? There’s no single answer. The perfect smile for you may look very different than the perfect smile for your friend, or even your sibling. Your smile should complement the dimensions of your face and should present well from every angle and regardless of facial expression.

 

All orthodontists and Invisalign dentists “straighten” your teeth in some manner. However, some use a “one smile fits all” approach that may not always do much to enhance their patients’ overall appearance. How well a person’s smile complements their face has a lot to do with why some smiles are more attractive and appealing than others.

 

Our treatments go beyond merely straightening teeth. We carefully analyze your facial features, then design a smile that looks natural and perfect for you. The size of your teeth, the space between them, how much of the teeth are exposed, and their relative position on every axis are just a few of the factors we consider when creating your smile. This may require more planning and creativity than the traditional approach to orthodontics, but the results are well worth the effort.

LASER TONGUE TIE RELEASE

Laser tongue Tie Release

 

Tongue Tie is a congenital condition characterized by an abnormally short lingual frenum ( a small tissue ), which may restrict tongue mobility causing speech and feeding issues.

With our advanced iLase pen laser tongue tie release and frenum release are a breeze for kids. Call our office for more info. 

 

SEDATION AND SLEEP DENTISTRY

SEDATION AND SLEEP DENTISTRY

We believe parents and guardians can contribute to the success of procedures and invite you to participate. Please read the following information to learn about this medication, its possible use for your child’s dental procedure, and how you can help.
Fast Facts About Sedation Dentistry
There are many types of sedation (se-DAY-shun) dentistry.
Sedation is the use of medication to make your child very calm for a procedure, but not sound asleep.
Sedation is done in our office.
We may recommend sedation dentistry for long or multiple procedures, for children with a high fear of dental care, those who have special needs, or children who find it difficult to sit still.
There may be some restrictions when your child goes home.
What is Sedation Dentistry?
Sedation dentistry is the use of a mild sedative (calming drugs) to manage special needs or anxiety while your child receives dental care. Sedation also may be used when several procedures need to be done at the same time, when the safety of a child may be compromised, or if your child has a strong “gag” reflex.
It is important to note that the sedation medication does not control pain or discomfort. Once your child has received sedation, we will give him or her an injection (shot) or injections in the treatment area to keep it pain-free during and after the procedure. The sedation medicine may last up to 6 hours after the treatment is done.
Types of Sedation
Nitrous Oxide
Often called “laughing gas,” nitrous oxide is a very safe, mild sedative that will help your child remain relaxed during dental procedures. It is usually administered with the use of a “space mask,” which carries air (oxygen) mixed with the medication. Your child will be asked to breathe through the nose, not the mouth, and will sense a faint, sweet smell. The sedation will take effect in about 5 minutes. The mask will remain in place until the procedure is done. Your child will be awake during the entire procedure and may have a “happy” feeling. When the procedure is complete, the nitrous oxide will be turned off and your child will breathe in pure oxygen for about 5 minutes to clear out any remaining gas. You should limit your child to a very light meal before this procedure, such as toast or a bagel.
Oral Sedatives
If your child is nervous, oral sedation may be used. It is taken by mouth or through the nose. This type of medicine will make your child a little drowsy, and will keep him or her relaxed and calm during the procedure. The medicine usually begins to work within 20 minutes.  Is administered to the child once you arrive at the appointment. If your child is having sedation, he or she should have nothing to eat or drink after midnight the night before the appointment.
IV Sedation
Intravenous (IV) sedation requires a needle to be inserted into your child’s vein, usually in the arm or hand. The biggest advantage to IV sedation is that the anesthesiologist  can give your child more medicine during a longer procedure to keep him or her relaxed. Home preparation is required for this type of sedation. This procedure is usually done by an anesthesiologist who comes to our office.
Home Preparation
When sedation is needed, there are important rules for eating and drinking that must be followed in the hours before the procedure. One business day before your child’s procedure, you will receive a phone call from the Dental office. Calls are not made on weekends or holidays. Please have a pen and paper ready to write down these important instructions.
You will get specific eating and drinking instructions for your child based on your child’s age. Following are the usual instructions for eating and drinking. No matter what age your child is, you should follow the specific instructions given to you on the phone.
For infants under 12 months:
Up to 6 hours before the scheduled arrival time, formula-fed babies may be given formula.
Up to 4 hours before the scheduled arrival time, breastfed babies may nurse.
For all children:
After midnight the night before the procedure, do not give any solid food or non-clear liquids. That includes milk, formula, juices with pulp, coffee, and chewing gum or candy.
Up to 2 hours before the scheduled arrival time, give only clear liquids. Clear liquids include water, Pedialyte®, Koolaide®, and juices you can see through, such as apple or white grape juice. Milk is not a clear liquid.
If your child takes daily medication, you may give it unless specifically told not to do so by your child’s doctor or the scheduling nurse.
Getting Drowsy
Once your child has been registered for the procedure, a member of the dental staff will meet with you to take your child’s vital signs, weight, and medical history. As the parent or legal guardian, you will be asked to sign a consent form before the sedation is given.
The dentist will meet with you and your child to review your child’s medical information and to explain the type of sedation your child will receive.
Sedation medication may be given by mouth, through the nose, or directly into a vein through an intravenous (IV) line.
The medicine will work in one of two ways — in a single dose that takes effect slowly and lasts throughout the procedure, or in a continuous dose throughout the procedure.
You may stay with your child until he or she is very drowsy.
During the procedure your child’s heart rate, blood pressure, temperature, and blood oxygen level will be monitored closely.
How To Comfort Your Child Before Induction
As a parent, watching your child undergo sedation may be a very uncomfortable experience for you. Children can sense a parent’s concern — so for your presence to be helpful to your child, you must try to be as calm and encouraging as possible.
There are ways you can help your child, even if you feel uncomfortable.
You can bring along a “comfort” item — such as a favorite toy, stuffed animal, or “blankie”— for your child to hold during the induction.
You can touch your child to remind your child that you are there. Holding your child’s hand or caressing his or her hair and face will remind your child of your presence.
You can whisper, talk, or sing to your child. The sound of your voice can provide reassurance.
Following Sedation
When the procedure is done, you will be called to the room to be with your child as the medication wears off.  The length of time it will take the medication to wear off will vary, as some children take longer than others to become alert.
Children coming out of sedation react in different ways. Your child might cry, be fussy or confused, feel sick to his or her stomach, or vomit. These reactions are normal and will go away as the sedation medication wears off.
When your child is discharged, he or she still might be groggy, dizzy, or nauseous, and should take it easy for the rest of the day.
At Home Care and Follow Up Visits
Your child’s nose, mouth, and throat may remain numb for 1 to 2 hours after the procedure.
Your child’s gums and mouth may be sore for several days afterward, depending on the dental procedure.
Use caution when your child eats and drinks for about 2 hours after the procedure, watching to make sure he or she does not bite the tongue or the inside of the mouth.
Your child should only eat soft foods for the first few hours after undergoing a dental procedure that requires sedation.
Your child is not to return to school or day care that day.
Upon returning home, your child should take it easy for the rest of the day.
We will tell you when you should schedule a follow-up visit.
When to Call the Dentist
If your child’s gums are sore, Tylenol® or Motrin® will help with any discomfort. If your child experiences any of the following for more than 24 hours, you should call us
fever
severe bleeding of the gums
severe pain
vomiting.
Special Needs
If your child has any special needs or health issues that you feel the dentist and anesthesiologist need to know about, please call us before the procedure. If your child has developed a cold, stuffy nose, or other condition that makes it hard to breathe through the nose, you will need to call us and your child’s procedure will have to be rescheduled. It is important to notify us in advance about any special needs your child might have.

MOUTH GUARD

MOUTH GUARD

The mouth and face of a child or young adult can be easily injured if the proper precautions are not used while participating in sports or recreational activities. In fact, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than half of the 7 million sports- and recreation-related injuries that occur each year are sustained by children as young as 5 years old. Last year, the National Youth Sports Safety Foundation (NYSSF) forecasted that more than 3 million teeth would be knocked out in youth sporting events. They also reported that athletes who don’t wear mouth guards are 60 times more likely to damage their teeth. Yet, in a survey* commissioned by the AAO, 67% of parents admitted that their children do not wear a mouth guard during organized sports. This raises a question: if mouth guards offer a simple and relatively inexpensive solution to help dramatically decrease the risk of oral injuries, why aren’t more kids wearing them?

The AAO survey* found that 84% of children do not wear mouth guards while playing organized sports because they are not required to wear them, even though they may be required to wear other protective materials, such as helmets and shoulder pads. At a time when a good football helmet or hockey stick may cost $200 each, mouth guards can be one of the least expensive pieces of protective equipment available. Not only do mouth guards save teeth, they help protect jaws.

An effective mouth guard holds teeth in place, resists tearing and allows for normal speech and breathing. It should cover the teeth and, depending on the patient’s bite, also the gums. Your dental professional can recommend the best mouth guard for every sports activity.  A properly fitted mouth guard can prevent many accidents and traumatic injuries.

The dental experts at the ASD, AAPD, AAOMS, AAO and ADA urge athletes, parents/caregivers and coaches to be proactive as they head out this spring and stay safe on the field.  The ASD, AAPD, AAOMS, AAO, and ADA dental experts offer these important tips:

·         Wear a mouth guard when playing contact sports.Mouth guards can help prevent injury to a person’s jaw, mouth and teeth and they are significantly less expensive than the cost to repair an injury.  Dentists and dental specialists can make customized mouth guards, which provide the best fit. Other less-expensive options are the boil and bite mouthguards, which are softened in boiling water to fit the mouth, and stock mouth guards, which are ready-to-wear but often don’t fit well.

·         Wear a helmet. Helmets absorb the energy of an impact and help prevent damage to the head.

·         Wear protective eyewear.Eyes are extremely vulnerable to damage, especially when playing sports.

·         Wear a face shield to avoid damage to the delicate bones around the eyes, nose and jaw. Hockey pucks, basketballs and racquetballs can cause severe facial damage at any age.

FAQS

Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

General Questions
What should I use to clean my baby’s teeth?
When should I take my child to the dentist for the first check-up?
What is the difference between a pediatric dentist and a family dentist?
How do I find a pediatric dentist in my hometown?
Are baby teeth really that important to my child?
What should I do if my child has a toothache?
Are thumbsucking and pacifier habits harmful for a child’s teeth?
How can I prevent decay caused by nursing?
How often does my child need to see the pediatric dentist?
Toothpaste: when should we begin using it and how much should we use?
How do I make my child’s diet safe for his teeth?
How do dental sealants work?
How do I know if my child is getting enough fluoride?
What can I do to protect my child’s teeth during sporting events?
What should I do if my child falls and knocks out a permanent tooth?
How safe are dental X-rays?
How can parents help prevent tooth decay?
Questions And Answers

What should I use to clean my baby’s teeth?
A toothbrush will remove plaque bacteria that can lead to decay. Any soft-bristled toothbrush with a small head, preferably one designed specifically for infants, should be used at least once a day at bedtime.
More: Dental Care For Your Baby

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When should I take my child to the dentist for the first check-up?
In order to prevent dental problems, your child should see a pediatric dentist when the first tooth appears, or no later than his/her first birthday.
More:First Check up.
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What is the difference between a pediatric dentist and a family dentist?
Pediatric dentists are the pediatricians of dentistry. A pediatric dentist has two to three years specialty training following dental school and limits his/her practice to treating children only. Pediatric dentists are primary and specialty oral care providers for infants and children through adolescence, including those with special health needs.
PEDIATRIC DENTIST
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How do I find a pediatric dentist in my hometown?
Click on the Find A Pediatric Dentist button located above. Enter your city, state and zip for a list of pediatric dentists nearest you. If your entries result in “no matching pediatric dentist records were found,” broaden your search by entering the state only or nearest city and state.
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Are baby teeth really that important to my child?
Primary, or “baby,” teeth are important for many reasons. Not only do they help children speak clearly and chew naturally, they also aid in forming a path that permanent teeth can follow when they are ready to erupt.
PEDIATRIC DENTIST
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What should I do if my child has a toothache?
First, rinse the irritated area with warm salt water and place a cold compress on the face if it is swollen. Give the child acetaminophen for any pain, rather than placing aspirin on the teeth or gums. Finally, see a dentist as soon as possible.
EMERGENCY
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Are thumbsucking and pacifier habits harmful for a child’s teeth?
Thumb and pacifier sucking habits will generally only become a problem if they go on for a very long period of time. Most children stop these habits on their own, but if they are still sucking their thumbs or fingers past the age of three, a mouth appliance may be recommended by your pediatric dentist.
Habits
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How can I prevent decay caused by nursing?
Avoid nursing children to sleep or putting anything other than water in their bed-time bottle. Also, learn the proper way to brush and floss your child’s teeth. Take your child to a pediatric dentist regularly to have his/her teeth and gums checked. The first dental visit should be scheduled by your child’s first birthday.
dental care for your baby
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How often does my child need to see the pediatric dentist?
A check-up every six months is recommended in order prevent cavities and other dental problems. However, your pediatric dentist can tell you when and how often your child should visit based on their personal oral health.
regular dental visits
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Toothpaste: when should we begin using it and how much should we use?
The sooner the better! Starting at birth, clean your child’s gums with a soft infant toothbrush or cloth and water. As soon as the teeth begin to appear, start brushing twice daily using fluoridated toothpaste and a soft, age-appropriate sized toothbrush. Use a “smear” of toothpaste to brush the teeth of a child less than 2 years of age. For the 2-5 year old, dispense a “pea-size” amount of toothpaste and perform or assist your child’s toothbrushing. Remember that young children do not have the ability to brush their teeth effectively.Children should spit out and not swallow excess toothpaste after brushing.
fluoride
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How do I make my child’s diet safe for his teeth?
Make sure your child has a balanced diet, including one serving each of: fruits and vegetables, breads and cereals, milk and dairy products, and meat fish and eggs. Limiting the servings of sugars and starches will also aid in protecting your child’s teeth from decay. You can also ask your pediatric dentist to help you select foods that protect your children’s teeth.
diet and snacking
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How do dental sealants work?
Sealants work by filling in the crevasses on the chewing surfaces of the teeth. This shuts out food particles that could get caught in the teeth, causing cavities. The application is fast and comfortable and can effectively protect teeth for many years.
Sealants
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How do I know if my child is getting enough fluoride?
Have your pediatric dentist evaluate the fluoride level of your child’s primary source of drinking water. If your child is not getting enough fluoride internally through water (especially if the fluoride level is deficient or if your child drinks bottled water without fluoride), then your pediatric dentist may prescribe fluoride supplements.
fluoride
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What can I do to protect my child’s teeth during sporting events?
Soft plastic mouthguards can be used to protect a child’s teeth, lips, cheeks and gums from sport related injuries. A custom-fitted mouthguard developed by a pediatric dentist will protect your child from injuries to the teeth, face and even provide protection from severe injuries to the head.
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What should I do if my child falls and knocks out a permanent tooth?
The most important thing to do is to remain calm. Then find the tooth. Hold it by the crown rather than the root and try to reinsert it in the socket. If that is not possible, put the tooth in a glass of milk and take your child and the glass immediately to the pediatric dentist.
EMERGENCY
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How safe are dental X-rays?
There is very little risk in dental X-rays. Pediatric dentists are especially careful to limit the amount of radiation to which children are exposed. Lead aprons and high-speed film are used to ensure safety and minimize the amount of radiation.
x-ray
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How can parents help prevent tooth decay?
Parents should take their children to the dentist regularly, beginning with the eruption of the first tooth. Then, the dentist can recommend a specific program of brushing, flossing, and other treatments for parents to supervise and teach to their children. These home treatments, when added to regular dental visits and a balanced diet, will help give your child a lifetime of healthy habits.
preventive dentistry
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EMERGENCY

Emergency Care

When your child needs urgent dental treatment, we are ready to help. Please keep this emergency number available and convenient.

(609 200 5437)

When your child needs urgent dental treatment, your pediatric dentist stands ready to help. Please keep the emergency number available and convenient.

What Should I Do If My Child’s Baby Tooth Is Knocked Out?

Contact your pediatric dentist as soon as possible. The baby tooth should not be replanted because of the potential for subsequent damage to the developing permanent tooth.

What Should I Do If My Child’s Permanent Tooth Is Knocked Out?

Find the tooth and rinse it gently in cool water. (Do not scrub or clean it with soap –– use only water!) If possible, replace the tooth in the socket immediately and hold it there with clean gauze or a wash cloth. If you can’t put the tooth back in the socket, place the tooth in a clean container with cold milk, saliva or water. Get to the pediatric dental office immediately. (Call the emergency number if it’s after hours.) The faster you act, the better your chances of saving the tooth.

What If A Tooth Is Chipped Or Fractured?

Contact your pediatric dentist immediately. Quick action can save the tooth, prevent infection and reduce the need for extensive dental treatment. Rinse the mouth with water and apply cold compresses to reduce swelling if the lip also was injured. If you can find the broken tooth fragment, place it in cold milk or water and bring it with you to the dental office.

What About A Severe Blow To The Head Or A Jaw Fracture?

You need immediate medical attention. A severe head injury can be life threatening. Keep in mind that an emergency medical team might be able to reach you faster than you can get to the hospital.

What If My Child Has A Toothache?

Call your pediatric dentist and visit the office promptly. To comfort your child, rinse the mouth with water. Over-the-counter children’s pain medication, dosed according to your child’s weight and age, might ease the symptoms. You may apply a cold compress or ice wrapped in a cloth to the face in the area of the pain, but do not put heat or aspirin on the sore area.

Can Dental Injuries Be Prevented?

Your child’s risk for dental injuries can be reduced greatly by following a few simple suggestions. First, reduce risk for severe oral injury in sports by wearing protective gear, including a mouthguard. Second, always use a car seat for young children and require seat belts for everyone else in the car. Third, childproof your home to prevent falls and electrical injuries.Regular dental check-ups provide your dentist an opportunity to discuss additional age-appropriate preventive strategies with your child.

The American Academy Of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD)